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Jackson High’s rain garden helps solve storm water pollution

Jackson High School’s Environmental Systems Design class and rain garden team creating a legacy. Photo courtesy of Everett Public Schools.
Jackson High School’s Environmental Systems Design class and rain garden team creating a legacy. Photo courtesy of Everett Public Schools.

From an Everett Public Schools News Release.

Environmental Systems Design class and rain garden team creating a legacy

This Snohomish Conservation District project is the first of its kind at Jackson High School. It’s designed to open the door for future classes to carry further down the path of storm water pollution solutions, and environmental improvement for our community.

The students are in the process of earning their Washington Green School certification by completing their first Washington Green Schools environmental project. As a class, they have planted all the flowers and plants to install the Rain Garden.

The process of installing the Jackson rain garden was a learning process for us all,” shared Gail Walters, environmental systems design class teacher and rain garden advisor.

From the research we did as a class, to the presentations, to going back to research again, it was a path that inspired us to actually make a difference at our school.”

About the Snohomish Conservation District

Snohomish Conservation District is a political subdivision of state government with no regulatory authority. We have been working with farmers, city residents, rural and suburban landowners on a voluntary basis since 1941. District boundaries include Camano Island (added in 1961) and most of Snohomish County. We operate with a diverse staff ranging from engineers, resource planners, community conservation staff, restoration specialists, a field crew, outreach specialists and administrative staff.

Conservation Districts are sub-units of state government. As such, all 45 conservation districts in Washington receive some basic funding from the Washington State Conservation Commission.  Snohomish Conservation District is also supported with two assessments, one from Island County for Camano Island, and one from Snohomish County. The District aggressively pursues local, state and Federal grants to further leverage our base funding. Wherever possible, the District partners with other entities to achieve similar goals working with land owners, urban, rural and sub-urban residents on conservation issues.

We received approval for an assessment of $5 per parcel and $.05 per acre for five years, beginning in 2010. The assessment was reauthorized in 2014 and runs through 2020.

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