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Whistling Gardener Blog

This is how to plant in the summer, from the Whistling Gardener

Now that the summer weather has arrived someone will ask the perennial question: “Can I still plant now or should I wait until the fall?”We can plant any time of the year provided the soil is not either frozen or water logged.

Now that the summer weather has arrived it never fails that someone will ask the perennial question: “Can I still plant now or should I wait until the fall?” For the record, we can plant any time of the year provided the soil is not either frozen or water logged. As promised last week, here is how to do it successfully in the summer.

The dreaded June to do list from the Whistling Gardener

June is the month I try to finish all the tasks that I thought I was going to complete in March, April and May (funny how that works).

June is the month I try to finish all the tasks that I thought I was going to complete in March, April and May (funny how that works). If you find you need a break from all these chores then come join me for Happy Hour with the Whistling Gardener, this Friday, June 6, 2014, from 4-5 pm at Sorticulture in Legion Park, Everett. If you are not there I will assume you are hard at work in the garden.

May musings and other rambling thoughts from the Whistling Gardener

Pitcher Plants are carnivorous and will help control unwanted insects like flies and mosquitos

It should be no surprise to my readers that May is a difficult month for me to accomplish much in my own garden (it is one of the unfortunate consequences of running a garden center). I can usually steal away a few hours at the end of the day to get the beds cleaned up and the soil prepared and then thankfully the Missus steps in and does most of the planting.

Beware of downy mildew, from the Whistling Gardener

For years I have planted flats of impatiens in our garden. Last year however our impatiens seemed to drop dead overnight early in the fall and the cause was a disease called downy mildew.

For years the missus and I have planted a dozen or so flats of impatiens in our garden in cool shady areas (but also in full sun) and enjoyed months of nonstop blooms clear up to the first frost.

Last year however our impatiens seemed to drop dead overnight early in the fall several weeks before they should have and the cause was a disease called downy mildew. IDM (impatiens downy mildew) started out on the east coast and has become epidemic to the point the nurseries no longer sell them.

April to do list part one, from The Whistling Gardener

We have set major records for rainfall in February and March and I am more than ready to embrace spring with all of my heart and soul. Here is part one of what the Whistling Gardener is going to be doing in his garden in the month of April.

I have mixed feelings about it being April already. On the one hand I can’t believe the first quarter of the year has evaporated before my very eyes or perhaps more accurately washed away (yes, we have set major records for rainfall in February and March). On the other hand I am more than ready to embrace spring with all of my heart and soul and get the old joint whipped into shape. Here is part one of what I am going to be doing in my garden in the month of April.

Time to get those cool season veggies planted, from the Whistling Gardener

March is the consummate month to plant “cool season” veggies like potatoes and carrots and onions and radishes, leaf crops like lettuce and spinach and cabbage and broccoli and finally peas. All of these crops demand a cool soil and cool air temperatures.

March is the consummate month to plant “cool season” veggies like potatoes and carrots and onions and radishes, leaf crops like lettuce and spinach and cabbage and broccoli and finally peas. All of these crops demand a cool soil and cool air temperatures to perform their best. When it starts to get too warm they will mature rapidly and go to seed.

What are your harbingers of Spring? From the Whistling Gardener

I have heard told that there are really only two seasons in the northwest, the rainy season and road construction season. There may be some truth to that. But despite the difficult transition from winter to spring there are sure signs of the season if you just look and listen.

Spring is an elusive season for the northwest. Typically what happens is that winter comes and goes for what seems like months on end and then one day we wake up and it is summer.

I have heard told that there are really only two seasons in the northwest, the rainy season and road construction season. There may be some truth to that. But despite the difficult transition from winter to spring there are sure signs of the season if you just look and listen. For me there are some very distinct indicators.

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