Advertisement

Jackson High School students recognized for contributions to science research

Shruti Parikh (12th grade) and Jacqueline Nguyen (11th grade), students at Henry M. Jackson High School, were formally recognized for their contributions to science research at the 6th Annual WSAS Meeting and Symposium held on September 12 in Seattle.
Jackson High School students Shruti Parikh and Jacqueline Nguyen tour the Museum of Flight. Photo credit: Everett School District.

From an Everett Public Schools News Release.

Shruti Parikh (12th grade) and Jacqueline Nguyen (11th grade), students at Henry M. Jackson High School, were selected as finalists for the Washington State Academy of Sciences (WSAS), Junior Academy Award in the spring of 2013.

Both students were formally recognized for their contributions to science research at the 6th Annual WSAS Meeting and Symposium held on September 12, 2013, in Seattle. Students toured the Museum of Flight, dined and discussed current and future projects with notable scientists in their fields of interest.

Ms. Parikh, Dr. David L. Eaton, Dean of Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences and Professor Estella B. Leopold of the Department of Biology at the University of Washington discussed several field-leading initiatives that closely related to Parikh’s research in Phytoremediation of Arsenic in Coal Dust using Western Sword Ferns (Polystichum munitum).

Ms. Nguyen met with Dr. Usha Varanasi from the University of Washington’s College of the Environment and Dr. R. Curtis Graeber of the Graeber Group and discussed potential next steps in her research concerning Minimizing Size and Weight in Standard Military Rations (MRE) for Increased Optimization for Field Use.

“It was so impressive listening to the conversations the students had with the Science Academy members. Seeing very distinguished PHDs talking to high school students on an even footing was truly amazing,” said Andy Sevald, Research and Engineering club advisor at Henry M. Jackson High School.

“There was no pandering, dumbing down, or condescension; in the eyes of the Academy these students had proven themselves and a tone of mutual respect was very evident,” concluded Sevald

Tags: 

Our featured sponsor

Google ad